Issue No. 8   -  15 January 2010
BIODIVERSITY IS LIFE
 

 
The IES wishes you an inspiring and successful new year! 

IES ACTIVITES
 
 




EVENTS and PUBLICATIONS
 
Dhaka - 16 January



 


 
 
 
IN THIS ISSUE
 
 
 
 
LEARN ABOUT CLIMATE CHANGE and SECURITY
 

University for Peace (UPEACE) presents a new specialisation in Climate Change and Security in its Masters curriculum, focussing on Environmental Security and Peace. 
 

The relationship between climate change and security is becoming a core issue within the climate framework. In this perspective, UPEACE organises Master courses directly addressed to the need for a clearer understanding of the multiple relationships between climate change and international, national and local security issues.
 
The academic premises on which the Climate Change and Security specialisation is built are: that environmental problems are closely linked to security issues at the individual, national and international levels; that climate change is one such issue and is a potential contributor to increased intra-state levels of conflict; and that the international community plays an essential role in governing the climate change mitigation and adaptation measures.
 
The ESP-CCS specialisation aspires to contribute to significant environmental and development improvements, such as the recognition and empowerment of local and indigenous communities in the shaping of climate change mitigation and adaptation measures, and the identification and mitigation of conflicts that arise from climate change related issues. 
 

CLIMATE AND CONFLICT: A DOUBLE DISASTER FOR THE POOREST PEOPLE
 
While world leaders have left Copenhagen with an inadequate “climate agreement”, the effects of climate change are already being experienced quite seriously in many parts of the world. 
 
  
In the Dutch newspaper Trouw (January 6th, 2010) Mark van Dorp and Eric van de Giessen plead for a special approach for such fragile states like Sudan and Afghanistan, offering people in those countries more protection to climate change. This will prevent them from being hit by a double disaster.

At the climate summit in Copenhagen, rich countries have pledged 30 billion dollar – mounting to 100 billion per year in 2020 – to help developing countries adapt to the negative effects of climate change. Governments of developing countries can use these funds for building dams or for training farmers in growing more drought-resistant crops, for instance.
 
However, in countries involved in civil war these funds will probably not be spent well and wisely. Democratic principles, as adopted in many other countries in the world, do not function in fragile states as these governments are often not capable, nor willing, to protect the most vulnerable people. Other, more innovative ways have to be found, therefore, to tackle climate change in fragile states.  



Link to more news: www.envirosecurity.org/news

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