Issue No. 14   -   20 July 2010
IT'S HOLIDAY TIME!
 
The IES team wishes you a great summer break!
 
Our next issue will be sent around in September

UPCOMING EVENT

European Parliament, Brussels - 01 September

IES: Environment, Development & Security: New Ideas, Fast Action
 
More info to come...
 
WORK IN PROGRESS


 
 
 
NEW: Report of 'The Hague Environmental Law Facility'
 
 
Environmental Security for Poverty Alleviation: 

Illegal Trade & Natural Resources:
  


LIBRARY

 
World Health Organisation
 

The Enough Project

 
 
 
 
IN THIS ISSUE
 
 
 

 ILLEGAL TRADE IN NATURAL RESOURCES. WHAT CAN BRUSSELS DO?
 
A two-day event to debate on illegal trade and on the role of European Union

On 29-30 September 2010 the issue of illegal trade in natural resources will be discussed by IES and its partners during a two-day event in Brussels.

The event, organised in the framework of IES Pathfinder project and in collaboration with BICC, GLOBE EU and Europe, International Alert, IISD, Madariaga – College of Europe Foundation, SIPRI, Transparency International and Worldwatch Institute, will be kick-started by an opening dinner on the evening of 29 and will be followed by the conference on Thursday 30 September.

Hosted at the European Economic and Social Committee, the conference will be developed around four main sessions with the aim to provide a global overview on the issue at stake through various perspectives, and to define what the EU can do to contribute to this struggle.
 

SECURITY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
 
New publication by IES Fellow Rita Floyd reflects on US environmental security policy

IES Fellow Rita Floyd publishes a new book on environmental security with Cambridge University Press. Security and the Environment: Securitisation Theory and US Environmental Security Policy traces United States’ environmental security policy over time from its early beginnings in 1993 when the first Clinton administration declared environmental security a national security issue, to the end of the Bush administrations in 2009, when environmental security had vanished from the US government’s agenda.

Floyd uses this changing US environmental security policy to revise the Copenhagen school’s influential ‘securitisation theory’, so that this theory allows the analyst to gain insights into the intentions of securitising actors. This revision reveals surprising findings regarding the intentions of key actors behind the Clinton day US environmental security policy; findings that are relevant especially also in the context of today’s push for ‘climate security’.

 
WATER AND HUMAN SECURITY IN SOUTH ASIA
 
IES fellow Michael Renner speaks about the issue of access to water in south Asia

The quantity and quality of available water play a crucial role in the politics of central-south Asia, and more specifically the Indus and Amu Darya water basins. Access to clean drinking water is a major, though largely unmet, objective and poor management lies at the heart of many problems.

Many areas in the region are already experiencing physical water shortages – recent studies estimate per capita water availability in the densely-populated Indus basin at around 1,000 cubic metres per year – and climate change will only exacerbate this.

The region’s water challenges do not inevitably lead to armed conflict. Unalleviated, however, they threaten to undermine human security and bring different communities into dispute. Cooperative approaches have been sparse and institutional structures in the region remain fragmented. Yet cooperation will be critical for the region to meet its water challenges in the years and decades ahead.

 
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